real action

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Krishnamurti real action

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Krishnamurti – Real Action

That is what we have been talking about this morning, the emptying of the mind of the ‘me’ and ‘you’ and the ‘we’ and ‘they.’ Then you can live from moment to moment, endlessly, without struggle, without conflict. But that is real action, not conflict, brutality and violence.

from The Flight of the Eagle

My Comment:

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what is self-knowing

Image result for fire in the mind Pupul Jayakar

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an energy that comes alive born of attention

“What is self-knowing? How do you know yourself? Is it in the observing of a thought springing up? We are reluctant to let go the first thought and so there is a conflict. Or is self-knowing to extinguish the first thought and perceive the second thought and then the third, then dropping the third and following the fourth, so that there is a constant alertness and awareness of the movement of thought and an energy that comes alive born of attention?”

Krishnamurti – Fire in the Mind PDF p. 6  – Pupul Jayakar

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existential anguish

 

 

 

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We are supposed to be upbeat and full of optimism about how wonderful this world can be once we are liberated from all outer and inner bondage. And it probably can indeed be wonderful, but is that the point? How can I be released from bondage if I am not ready to face reality?

So what is reality? First of all it is the fact of Eternity with a capital “E”. This has all been going on for millions and billions and quadrillions of time. It did not start and there is no way it can end.  Continue reading

floating awareness

Image result for floating awareness fine art america

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Go to the source. I observe images being formed in consciousness and then how they translate into manifest reality. Where do these images originate? To whom do they appear? I feel how I allow energy to flow into those images, almost as a compulsion. I can hold back the energy with fine restraint and hold it in a place before it streams out into the outward-turned mind. It is like turning the handlebars of a bike 180 degrees and going back on the path I came and then staying there. This occurs at some times unexpectedly. I suddenly notice that I am holding the energy of manifestation in a place of “holding”, in a “holding zone”. Even the thought “I am noticing” feels like an intrusion at that moment (which is out of time). It is such, though, that the thought of noticing doesn’t disturb that state of “holding”. Continue reading

face this emptiness

 

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Can the mind face and live with this emptiness and not escape in any direction?

(Krishnamurti – The Urgency of Change)

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To escape from the emptiness is fear. I fear the emptiness. As soon as I begin some ‘doing’ I have begun to fill the emptiness. What is the emptiness? Is it the sense of everything going on and on forever into all eternity? I see that everything has been going on for billions and billions of years, billions of cycles of the earth around the sun and, of course, even before and beyond that.  

How can achievements and goals hold any validity in that immensity of space without measure? The sages speak of being in the space free of concepts like space and time and free of the sense of being a center as ‘me’. Here where I am, however, there is still the compulsion to move and create those fascinating (and sometimes horrific) patterns in the mind-stuff. Those I can hold on to, those I know and those give me a sense of the familiar. 

It is said that the way out of the compulsion of the ‘love to be’ is to relax into the ‘mere being’. He said: “Although this body is lying lifeless like a corpse, I know that I am. Unaffected in the least by this death my being is shining clearly.” (Ramana) This is the fact: My being is NOT one with the body, but is of its own, eternal, changeless, self-shining. The words come out onto the page easily now, but the realization of this “fact” is still not steady and continuous. It comes in flashes and then it is gone. 

Yes, I had my own extended episode of realization that time in the hotel in Colombo – when was it? Sometime around 1982… I was on my way back from my tour of Tamil Nadu and my sojourn at Ramana’s Ashram in Tiruvannamalai. The entire hotel, all physical surroundings were palpably ‘the Heart” that was ‘taking care of me’. Now Mooji says: “The Heart is what we are.” This ‘something’ that has no form but pervades all forms – how it escapes my awareness!

My awareness is hard-wired to rely on the data-input from my physical sense organs. Is there a marriage of the two? or as the Yoga Sutras say: The energy of Pure Seeing is distinct from the energy of the Seen, the Observed. When they mix, there is avidya, confusion.

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hear the water

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Krishnamurti Go out alone

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So we see that thought engenders one kind of fear. But is there fear at all apart from that? Is fear always the result of thought and, if it is, is there any other form of fear? We are afraid of death – that is, something that is going to happen tomorrow or the day after tomorrow, in time. There is a distance between actuality and what will be. Now thought has experienced this state; by observing death it says, `I am going to die.’ Thought creates the fear of death, and if it doesn’t is there any fear at all? Is fear the result of thought? If it is, thought being always old, fear is always old. As we have said, there is no new thought. If we recognise it, it is already old. So what we are afraid of is the repetition of the old – the thought of what has been projecting into the future. Therefore thought is responsible for fear. This is so, you can see it for yourself. When you are confronted with something immediately there is no fear. It is only when thought comes in that there is fear.

Therefore our question now is, is it possible for the mind to live completely, totally, in the present? It is only such a mind that has no fear. But to understand this, you have to understand the structure of thought, memory and time. And in understanding it, understanding not intellectually, not verbally, but actually with your heart, your mind, your guts, you will be free from fear; then the mind can use thought without creating fear.

Thought, like memory, is, of course, necessary for daily living. It is the only instrument we have for communication, working at our jobs and so forth. Thought is the response to memory, memory which has been accumulated through experience, knowledge, tradition, time. And from this background of memory we react and this reaction is thinking. So thought is essential at certain levels but when thought projects itself psychologically as the future and the past, creating fear as well as pleasure, the mind is made dull and therefore inaction is inevitable.

So I ask myself, `Why, why, why, do I think about the future and the past in terms of pleasure and pain, knowing that such thought creates fear? Isn’t it possible for thought psychologically to stop, for otherwise fear will never end?’

One of the functions of thought is to be occupied all the time with something. Most of us want to have our minds continually occupied so that we are prevented from seeing ourselves as we actually are. We are afraid to be empty. We are afraid to look at our fears.

There is only total fear, but how can the mind which thinks in fragments observe this total picture? Can it? We have lived a life of fragmentation, and can look at that total fear only through the fragmentary process of thought. The whole process of the machinery of thinking is to break up everything into fragments: I love you and I hate you; you are my enemy, you are my friend; my peculiar idiosyncrasies and inclinations, my job, my position, my prestige, my wife, my child, my country and your country, my God and your God – all that is the fragmentation of thought. And this thought looks at the total state of fear, or tries to look at it, and reduces it to fragments. Therefore we see that the mind can look at this total fear only when there is no movement of thought.

You can watch only when the mind is very quiet, just as you can listen to what someone is saying only when your mind is not chattering with itself, carrying on a dialogue with itself about its own problems and anxieties. Can you in the same way look at your fear without trying to resolve it, without bringing in its opposite, courage – actually look at it and not try to escape from it? When you say, `I must control it, I must get rid of it, I must understand it’, you are trying to escape from it.

You can observe a cloud or a tree or the movement of a river with a fairly quiet mind because they are not very important to you, but to watch yourself is far more difficult because there the demands are so practical, the reactions so quick. So when you are directly in contact with fear or despair, loneliness or jealousy, or any other ugly state of mind, can you look at it so completely that your mind is quiet enough to see it? Can the mind perceive fear and not the different forms of fear – perceive total fear, not what you are afraid of? If you look merely at the details of fear or try to deal with your fears one by one, you will never come to the central issue which is to learn to live with fear.

To live with a living thing such as fear requires a mind and heart that are extraordinarily subtle, that have no conclusion and can therefore follow every movement of fear. Then if you observe and live with it – and this doesn’t take a whole day, it can take a minute or a second to know the whole nature of fear – if you live with it so completely you inevitably ask, ‘Who is the entity who is living with fear? Who is it who is observing fear, watching all the movements of the various forms of fear as well as being aware of the central fact of fear? Is the observer a dead entity, a static being, who has accumulated a lot of knowledge and information about himself, and is it that dead thing who is observing and living with the movement of fear? Is the observer the past or is he a living thing?’

What is your answer? Do not answer me, answer yourself. Are you, the observer, a dead entity watching a living thing or are you a living thing watching a living thing? Because in the observer the two states exist.

The observer is the censor who does not want fear; the observer is the totality of all his experiences about fear. So the observer is separate from that thing he calls fear; there is space between them; he is forever trying to overcome it or escape from it and hence this constant battle between himself and fear – this battle which is such a waste of energy.
As you watch, you learn that the observer is merely a bundle of ideas and memories without any validity or substance, but that fear is an actuality and that you are trying to understand a fact with an abstraction which, of course, you cannot do. But,in fact, is the observer who says, `I am afraid’, any different from the thing observed which is fear? The observer is fear and when that is realized there is no longer any dissipation of energy in the effort to get rid of fear, and the time-space interval between the observer and the observed disappears. When you see that you are a part of fear, not separate from it – that you are fear – then you cannot do anything about it; then fear comes totally to an end.

source: Krishnamurti, Freedom From The Known PDF p. 33 -37

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