quiet, peaceful, benign shade

 

the deep, dark blue state

dark blue

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Nisargadatta:  You must come to a firm decision. You must forget the thought that you are a body and be only the knowledge “I Am,” which has no form, no name. Just be. When you stabilize in that beingness it will give you all the knowledge and all the secrets to you, and when the secrets are given to you, you transcend the beingness, and you, the Absolute, will know that you are also not the consciousness. Having gained all this knowledge, having understood what is what, a kind of quietude prevails, a tranquility. Beingness is transcended, but beingness is available. Continue reading

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the anomalous blip of “me” and “mine”

 

 

https://newearthpulse.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/tomass-beach-cave-2.jpg?w=632&h=473

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Whatever there is to say I do not know. The latest revelation of Myself to Myself was the view that we are programmed to allow ourselves access only to pragmatic data regarding our survival. That is why there is such comfort and a feeling of familiarity when an activity presents itself to “do” on a practical level. There is a blanket to fold and put up into the cupboard; teeth are to be brushed; food for the jays is to be got out of the garage and put outside onto their feeder; coffee to be made and drunk, and so on. The day is filled with “things to do”. Even “sitting doing nothing” becomes a thing to do. Continue reading

let “I am” do its thing

 

 

Thetis-- One of the Nereids:

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June 29, 1980

Nisargadatta Maharaj: Whatever concept you have about yourself cannot be true. The “I Amness” is the prime concept, and it has to be satisfied by letting it do its normal work in the world. The important thing is the realization of the fact that it is a concept.

Questioner: In the world this concept is always trying to be at the top. Even to the children we say, “You must be first in the examination.” Is it wrong to push your personality and individuality on others?

M. What is wrong is that you consider yourself to be limited to this body and shape. What knowledge I try to give is given to the knowledge “I Am” in each of you, which is the same. If you try to get that knowledge as an individual you will never get it. Continue reading

antarmukha-drishti

 

Image result for words of grace ramana maharshi

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It is only when the subtle mind is externalized through the activity of the intellect and the sense-organs that gross name and form constituting the world appear. When, on the  other hand, the mind stays firmly in the Heart, they recede and disappear. Restraint of the out-going mind and its absorption in the Heart is known as introversion (antarmukha-drishti). The release of the mind and its emergence from the Heart is known as extroversion (bahirmukha-drishti). If in this manner the mind becomes absorbed in the Heart, the ego or ‘I’, which is the centre of the multitude of thoughts, finally vanishes and pure Consciousness or Self, which subsists during all the states of the mind, alone remains resplendent. It is this state, where there is not the slightest trace of the ‘I’-thought, that is the true Being of oneself. And that is called Quiescence or Mouna (Silence).

Words of Grace PDF p. 6 – Ramana

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awakened doing

Expand your potential with consciousness

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THE THREE MODALITIES OF AWAKENED DOING

Being Content, No Matter the Circumstance

 

This piece is an excerpt from Eckhart Tolle’s  book A New Earth.

There are three ways in which consciousness can flow into what you do and thus through you into this world, three modalities in which you can align your life with the creative power of the universe. Modality means the underlying energy­ frequency that flows into what you do and connects your actions with the awakened consciousness that is emerging into this world. What you do will be dysfunctional and of the ego, unless it arises out of one of these three modalities. They may change during the course of a day, although one of them may be dominant during a certain stage in your life.

Continue reading

the supreme word

Silence Tibetan Monk Walking

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“…which is absolute silence”

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My Comment:

As many of you know, I often post onto this blog what it is that I am currently studying for my own practice. I am currently immersing myself in this book:  Happiness and the Art of Being and the following excerpt may be a bit special and not everyone’s interest. If you find it  difficult reading due to all of the original quotes, at the bottom the author summarizes it in fluid language again. Check it out!

This passage is also particular to me since it is due to the term >>vastu<< used here that I was made aware of this book. I had seen Ramana refer to that term elsewhere but only cursorily.  I did a search and came across the term again in this book through books.google.com.

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from: Michael James, Happiness and the Art of Being 

The fact that ‘I’ and ‘am’ are the original and natural names of the absolute reality or God is stated emphatically by Sri Ramana in verses 712, 713, 714 and 715 of Guru Vācaka Kōvai:

“When meypporuḷ [the ‘real substance’, ‘true essence’ or absolute reality], which is called uḷḷam [the ‘heart’ or ‘core’], itself [seemingly] comes out and spreads gradually from the heart as consciousness [that is, when it seems to manifest outwardly as innumerable names and forms, which are actually just imaginary distortions of the one true formless and undivided consciousness ‘I am’, which is that ‘real substance’ itself], among the thousands of [sacred] names that are [attributed] to [this] uḷḷa-poruḷ [the ‘being-essence’ or absolute reality], know that when [we] scrutinise [we will discover that] ‘I’ indeed is the first [the original and foremost].”

“Since [together] with that ‘I’, which was previously [in the above verse] said to be the primary name [of the absolute reality or God], as its meypporuḷ-viḷakkam [the light which is its real essence] it [‘am’] always exists as ‘I am’ [in the heart of each one of us], that name ‘am’ also is [the primary name of the absolute reality or God].”

“Among the many names [attributed to God in all the different religions and languages of this world], which are thousandfold, no name has [such] real beauty [or] is [so] truly appropriate to kaḍavuḷ [God, who is kaḍandu-uḷḷavaṉ, ‘he who exists transcending’], who abides in [our] heart devoid of thought, like this name [‘I’ or ‘am’]. [That is, ‘I’ or ‘am’ is the most beautiful and truly appropriate name of God, because he exists in our heart as our naturally thought-free self-conscious being, ‘I am’.]”

“Among all [the names of God] that are known, only the [original, natural and true] name of God, [which is experienced] as ‘I [am] I’, will thunder [its sole supremacy] to those whose attention is selfward-facing, shining forth as the mauna-parā-vāk [the supreme word, which is absolute silence], filling the space of [their] heart, in which [their] ego has been annihilated.”

When we turn our attention self-wards and thereby experience ourself as we really are, our mind or ego will be annihilated, all duality will disappear, and in the thought-free space of our heart, which is the infinite space of being-consciousness-bliss, only our non-dual self-consciousness ‘I am’ will remain shining clearly in all its pristine purity. Since there is nothing to disturb the perfect peace of this experience of true self-knowledge, and since it reveals its own absolute reality more clearly than any spoken or written words could ever do, Sri Ramana describes it as the mauna-parā-vāk, the ‘supreme word’ or parā-vāk, which is absolute silence or mauna.

The power of the silent clarity of unadulterated self-consciousness to reveal itself as the absolute reality is expressed by Sri Ramana poetically in verse 5 of Ēkātma Pañcakam:

“That which always exists is only that ēkātma vastu [the one reality or substance, which is our own true self]. Since the ādi-guru at that time made that vastu to be known [only by] speaking without speaking, say, who can make it known [by] speaking?”

The word ēka means ‘one’, ātma means ‘self’, and vastu is the Sanskrit equivalent of the Tamil word poruḷ, which means the absolute reality, substance or essence. Therefore the ēkātma vastu, which Sri Ramana declares to be eppōdum uḷḷadu, ‘that which always is’, is the one absolute reality or essential substance, which is our own true self.

In the kaliveṇbā version of Ēkātma Pañcakam Sri Ramana added two more words to qualify uḷḷadu, which means ‘that which is’, namely taṉadu oḷiyāl, which mean ‘by its own light’. Thus he declared not only that the ēkātma vastu is the only thing that always exists, but also that it is ‘that which always exists by its own light’, that is, by its own light of non-dual self-consciousness, ‘I am’.

The compound word ādi-guru means the ‘original guru’, and is a term that denotes Sri Dakshinamurti, a form of God that symbolises the revelation of the absolute reality through silence, which is the ‘supreme word’ or parā-vāk, and which Sri Ramana describes poetically as ‘speaking without speaking’, that is, communicating the truth without thought or spoken words. Since the ēkātma vastu is our own thought-free and therefore absolutely silent self-conscious being, it can only reveal itself by shining within us silently and clearly as ‘I am I’, without the obstruction of any thoughts or words.

source: Michael James, Happiness and the Art of Being, An introduction to the philosophy and practice of the spiritual teachings of Bhagavan Sri Ramana PDF p. 266, 267

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breathe as the sleeping babe

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My Comment:

I posted this verse 10 of the Tao Te Ching in June of 2017 and now I am posting it again. I continually come back to the phrase:

“He cleans the dark mirror of his mind,
so that it reflects without intent.”

and the wording: “…it reflects without intent” for me captures the real quintessence of all the practices that interest me. Also the words “He cleans the dark mirror…” express so appropriately in simple words that all practices at some point are simply identifying what it is in my life that is an obstruction to the pure “energy of pure seeing” and then to remove it. Continue reading

Atma Vichara from Art of Being

 

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from: Michael James, Happiness and the Art of Being 

Bhagavan Sri Ramana never sought of his own accord to teach anyone the truth that he had come to know, because in his experience that truth – the consciousness ‘I am’ – alone exists, and hence there is no person either to give or to receive any teaching. However, though he inwardly knew that consciousness is the only reality, he was nevertheless outwardly a personification of love, compassion and kindness, because, knowing both himself and all other things to be nothing but the consciousness ‘I am’, he saw himself in everything, and hence he quite literally loved all living beings as his own self. Therefore, when people asked him questions about the reality and the means of attaining it, he patiently answered their questions, and thus without any volition on his part he gradually revealed a wealth of spiritual teachings.

Continue reading