wear shoes

 

::

Quote by Ramana Maharshi

::

::

::

Advertisements

the mongrel mind

::

Watching how the mind works I see how stray desires, like mongrels roaming the streets, draw my thoughts, my images away from Self and outward into dank corners and crevices. There these mongrels find enticing odors. For these deprived beings the more putrid the odor the better. For the mongrel mind it is the same: it is seduced over and over again by its attraction to ‘news’, images and stories of violence, war, injustice, lust, carnal pleasures, sadness, despair, hopelessness, apocalypse, riches, luxury, future utopias, pain, unveiling of ‘secret knowledge’ etc. etc. They are the great attractors, promising some degrading kind of sweetness. All these attractors have in common that at their essence they are based on some form of violence; that is their underlying frequency and deeper feeling tone. They all draw me away from Self, my own true Self.  Continue reading

the incredible Hulk and spirituality

 

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/ca/55/44/ca55440be21f2454783bb2dcca79b1d0.jpg

The thought of God, of that which is beyond, is the activity of the mind that awakens the desire to know what I really am.

That desire is akin to a surge of energy felt within that can spark the leap beyond the mind. The desire to know what I really am means the visceral urge to BE THAT, and has nothing to do with the intellect. It is an inner dynamic similar to the transformation of the Marvel Comics character Bruce Banner into the comic book hero Hulk. The angrier Hulk gets, the stronger he gets, and his capacity for physical strength is potentially limitless due to the fact that the Hulk’s strength increases proportionally with his level of great emotional stress. The dynamic of emotional charge bringing our thoughts into manifestation is illustrated by the figure Hulk – it is a valid understanding of the ‘mechanics’ of manifestation. In difference to Hulk, the emotional charge of one with this urge to BE the undying SELF has a limitless potential for deeper and deeper inner connection with our true primordial nature – what we are prior to the projection of the phenomenal world by the mind. It’s now up to us to use that understanding to create a New Earth of Love, Understanding, Compassion, Forgiveness and Service to Others. Continue reading

don’t talk to anyone about it – Mooji

mooji2

::

Sahaja

Are you ready to meet God?
Then, right now, don’t touch anything, not any idea—neither good nor bad.
Don’t get involved in anything at all.
Anything that appears, just leave it.
Don’t hold onto anything, including your self-image.
And don’t be too busy leaving things.
At a certain point you leave them as they come—no pockets to store things.
Be free of all involvements.
No name, no shape, no form, no intention, no dreams, no aspirations.
Neither mix nor associate with anything.
If someone comes and taps you on the shoulder and needs help with anything,
do what needs to be done, but don’t identify. Remain inwardly empty. Tell no one.
When you leave everything, He will come to meet you.
You will know Him who is your Self.
But you won’t be able to talk about it.
It must not be an experience that ‘you’ have.
The personal self, the ego, must not survive this inquiry.
So there must not be somebody who has attained or achieved anything.
No name. No signature.
Let everything be burnt or washed away.
Master said: Die but don’t be dead.
Meaning, die to all your personal notions of God, the world, and yourself.
Then you will find that which is Unborn.
This is your God Self.
Do this.
Sit by yourself and simply keep quiet.
This is my invitation.
Don’t talk to me or anyone about it.
I will meet you there.

~ Mooji, Sahaja 2015

source

Sahaja Sanskrit: सहज, meaning “spontaneous, natural, simple, or easy”

.

.

.

 

serenity

serenity

Serenity is one of the most important quality of my experience on this physical plane. There are many ways to maintain serenity. The one I have been most attracted to lately is mindfulness. For me this means continually bringing my mind back to my body so as to be physically present in all I do more and more. Continue reading

Godhead and I

Go With The Flow Sunita Anand

Go With The Flow
Sunita Anand

“The invitation is always to stop – to stop the projections, internally and externally, to stop what you imagine other people are projecting. You stop it all. It’s a hall of mirrors and it gets scary when it’s believed in. But when you stop, and you’re very still, there’s nothing happening.” Gangaji

Godhead: from Middle English godhede, “godhood”, and unrelated to the modern word “head” source

This term “godhood” points to what I often call the creative Force or First Principle energy, capitalized to signify the highest conceivable force or principle. Continue reading

The Undercurrent That Vivifies the Mind

Visitor: How can my mind be still if I have to use it more than other people? I want to go into solitude and renounce my headmaster’s work.
ramana_maharshi_monkey_devoteeRamana: No. You may remain where you are and go on with the work. What is the undercurrent which vivifies the mind, enables it to do all this work? It is the Self. So that is the real source of your activity. Simply be aware of it during your work and do not forget it. Contemplate in the background of your mind even whilst working. To do that, do not hurry, take your own time. Keep the remembrance of your real nature alive, even while working, and avoid haste which causes you to forget. Be deliberate. Practice meditation to still the mind and cause it to become aware of its true relationship to the Self which supports it. Do not imagine it is you who are doing the work. Think that it is the underlying current which is doing it. Identify yourself with the current. If you work unhurriedly, recollectedly, your work or service need not be a hindrance.

This is an excerpt from David Godman’s book, “Ramana Maharshi – Be As You Are”, p. 130

Consciousness along with quietness in the mind

ramana_maharshi_monkey_devoteeThis short dialog between Ramana Maharshi and a questioner gives some insight into the state that according to Ramana is most suitable to allow realization of the Self, that underlying quality of Consciousness that is like the screen in the movie theater. We are usually focused on the shapes moving on the screen. When that focus shifts to the screen itself we realize the Self which is undying and unborn. As this realization of the Self deepens and begins to be effortless we realize that which connects us to every other being in existence. Then understanding and compassion take the place of struggle and fear.

Questioner: There are times when persons and things take a vague, almost a transparent form, as in a dream. One ceases to observe them as outside, but is passively conscious of their existence, while not actively conscious of any kind of selfhood. There is a deep quietness in the mind. Is it at such times that one is ready to dive into the Self? Or is this condition unhealthy, the result of self-hypnotism? Should it be encouraged as yielding temporary peace?

Ramana: There is Consciousness along with quietness in the mind; this is exactly the state to be aimed at. The fact that the question has been framed on this point, without realizing that it is the Self, shows that the state is not steady but casual.

The word ‘diving’ is appropriate when there are outgoing tendencies, and when, therefore, the mind has to be directed and turned within, there is a dip below the surface of externalities. But when quietness prevails without obstructing the Consciousness, where is the need to dive? If that state has not been realised as the Self, the effort to do so may be called ‘diving’. In this sense the state may be said to be suitable for realization or diving. Thus, the last two questions you have put do not arise.

Zen and The Ego

zen circle 8

“For the ego exists in an abstract sense alone, being an abstraction from memory, somewhat like the illusory circle of fire made by a whirling torch.”

In this excerpt, Alan Watts describes more in detail two terms that are of basic importance to a clear understanding of the Buddhist view of existence: the precepts of “impermanence” (anitya) and “no-Self” (anatman), that some of you may be familiar with.

“The anitya doctrine is, again, not quite the simple assertion that the world is impermanent, but rather that the more one grasps at the world, the more it changes. Reality in itself is neither permanent nor impermanent; it cannot be categorized. But when one tries to hold on to it, change is everywhere apparent, since, like one’s own shadow, the faster one pursues it, the faster it flees.
Continue reading