gazing into vacancy

ramana1

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Yes. It is really like gazing into vacancy

or a dazzling crystal or light.

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Question: Can a line of thought or a series of questions induce self-hypnotism?
Should it not be reduced to a single point analyzing the unanalyzable, elementary and vaguely perceived and elusive ‘I’?

Ramana: Yes. It is really like gazing into vacancy or a dazzling crystal or light.

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I was not

 Crab-Nebula

“I didn’t know I was, presently I know I am, this is the same “I” with the knowingness mantle over it. This is the way the very Absolute transformed Itself into this grosser consciousness state, the state of appearance.”

“Nobody wants to inquire about the Self deeply and thoroughly, everybody inquires on a superficial level.” (Nisargadatta, Prior to Consciousness p. 54)

I was not. Then suddenly, I was. It feels like I am, but actually, I am not. If I had known what a trap I was getting into, I would not have gone into my mother’s womb. This sounds like a rejection of being alive, but it is not. It is neither rejection nor acceptance. This is the fine line of the paradox that my consciousness has to walk in order to find my way out of the labyrinth of consciousness. Continue reading

what is the nature of the Self? – Ramana

Ramana1

Ramana Maharshi

The following nine answers to questions posed to Ramana, an excerpt from what is known as “Nan Yar” (Who am I?) speak to me especially these days.

Please see the very useful introduction by T. M. P. MAHADEVAN , University of Chennai, India, following this excerpt.

16. What is the nature of the Self?

What exists in truth is the Self alone. The world, the individual soul, and God are appearances in it. like silver in mother-of-pearl, these three appear at the same time, and disappear at the same time. The Self is that where there is absolutely no “I” thought. That is called “Silence”. The Self itself is the world; the Self itself is “I”; the Self itself is God; all is Siva, the Self. Continue reading

Get Back Into The HEART Through The Brain

This is a text from “The Collected Works of Ramana Maharshi” (p. 295)

Verses 6, 7 and 8 contain the core of this text which contains Ramana’s teaching in a nutshell.  In Verse 8 Ramana speaks of the years he spent as a youth from the age of sixteen until his mid-twenties in silence. During these ten years he was absorbed into the Self, which he terms the Heart. He then began to communicate to those who had been attracted to him as devotees of his experience. His “method” or “system” that he refers to in this verse is Atma Vichara or Self Inquiry. I intend to comment more on this text in the coming days.

ad-ramana-maharshi sitting small

The Heart and the Brain

About these nine verses the Maharshi said, “When I was in Virupaksha Cave, Nayana came there once with a boy named Arunachala [N. S. Arunachalam Iyer]. He had studied up to the school’s final class. While Nayana and I were talking, the boy sat in a bush nearby. He somehow listened to our conversation and composed nine verses in English, giving the gist of what we were talking about. The verses were good and so I translated them into Tamil verses in Ahaval metre. They read like the Telugu Dwipada metre.”

The following is a prose rendering of Sri Bhagavan’s Tamil translation of the nine verses.
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Spiritual Realization – The Inward Journey

innerjourney-logo4Spiritual realization is the aim that exists in each one of us to seek our divine core. That core, though never absent from anyone, remains latent within us. It is not an outward quest for a Holy Grail that lies beyond, but an Inward Journey to allow the inner core to reveal itself.

In order to find out how to reveal our innermost Being, the sages explored the various sheaths of existence, starting from body and progressing through mind and intelligence, and ultimately to soul. The yogic journey guides us from our periphery, the body, to the center of our being, the soul. The aim is to integrate the various layers so that the inner divinity shines out as through clear glass. (from “The Inward Journey” by  B. K. S. Iyengar)
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