the ultimate dimension – Thich Nhat Hanh Part II

https://www.flickr.com/photos/speakingoffaith/10033148076

Thich Nhat Hanh Calligraphy

My comments:

This is part two of two. The modern Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh expounds in a concise and everyday manner a basic understanding of Buddha’s teachings. This second part focuses on the second and third of the three Dharma Seals that the Buddha passed on to us: the teaching of no-self and nirvana. Thay gives us simple examples of how to practice these in our daily life. He makes it clear how understanding and practicing these basic teachings of the Buddha gives us a basis for clarity and a way of living with strong ethics. I find this essay so timely for each of us to support us in being part of the new earth that is emerging now. Enjoy part two!

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THE PRACTICE OF LOOKING DEEPLY

No Self

Impermanence is looking at reality from the point of view of time. No self is looking at reality from the point of view of space. They are two sides of reality. No self is a manifestation of impermanence, and impermanence is a manifestation of no self. If things are impermanent, they are without a separate self. If things are without a separate self, they are impermanent.

Impermanence means being transformed at every moment. This is reality. And since there is nothing unchanging, how can there be a permanent self, a separate self? When we say “self,” we mean something that is always itself, unchanging day after day. But nothing is like that. Our body is impermanent, our emotions are impermanent and our perceptions are impermanent. Our anger, our sadness, our love, our hatred and our consciousness are also impermanent. So what permanent thing is there that we can call a self? Continue reading

the ultimate dimension – Thich Nhat Hanh Part I

original calligraphy by Thich Nhat Hanh:

My comments: This is the first part of two. The modern Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh expounds in a concise and everyday manner a basic understanding of Buddha’s teachings. This first part focuses on the first of the three Dharma Seals that the Buddha passed on to us: the teaching of impermanence. Thay gives us simple examples of how to practice this in our daily life. He makes it clear how understanding and practicing impermanence gives us a basis for clarity and a way of living with strong ethics. I find this essay so timely for each of us to support us in being part of the new earth that is emerging now. Enjoy part one!

THE PRACTICE OF LOOKING DEEPLY

“All authentic practices of the Buddha carry within themselves three essential teachings called the Dharma Seals. These three teachings of the Buddha are impermanence, no self and nirvana. Just as all important legal documents have the mark or signature of a witness, all genuine practices of the Buddha bear the mark of these three teachings.

“If we look into the first Dharma Seal, impermanence, we see that it doesn’t just mean that everything changes. By looking into the nature of things, we can see that nothing remains the same for even two consecutive moments. Because nothing remains unchanged from moment to moment, it therefore has no fixed identity or permanent self. So in the teaching of impermanence we always see the lack of an unchanging self. We call this “no self” It is because things are always transforming and have no self that freedom is possible. Continue reading

Zen: Everyday Living and Working

This is an excerpt from the introduction by Roshi Philip Kapleau to Thich Nhat Hanh’s book “Zen Keys”:

kapleauroshi_summer1993“It is well to note that while Zen Keys often presents weighty aspects of Buddhist philosophy, Nhat Hanh begins his book with the concrete, practical aspects of life in a Zen monastery, where the emphasis is not on the learning of philosophic concepts but on simple labor and a life of awareness. For in Zen, intellectual learning is nothing but the studying of the menu, while actual practice is the eating of the meal.
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B4Peace June – Peace at Home with the Buddha

BUDDHISM: Peace At Home

This is Buddha’s wisdom  for peace in relationships, spoken by Thich Nhat Hanh:

The Practice of Looking Deeply: Practicing Impermanence

All of us can understand impermanence with our intellect, but this is not yet true understanding. Our intellect alone will not lead us to freedom. It will not lead us to enlightenment.

When we are solid and we concentrate, we can practice looking deeply. And when we look deeply and see the nature of impermanence, we can then be concentrated on this deep insight. This is how the insight of impermanence becomes part of our being. It becomes our daily experience.
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