I am At Home in the World

A very timely message for this season of

“Peace On Earth”

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Questioner: If you are nothing in particular, then you must be the universal.

Nisargadatta: What is to be universal — not as a concept, but as a way of life? Not to separate, not to oppose, but to understand and love whatever contacts you, is living universally. To be able to say truly: I am the world, the world is me, I am at home in the world, the world is my own. Continue reading

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the sum total of flashes

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Q: Like beads on a string, events follow events — for ever.
Nisargadatta: They are all strung on the basic idea: ‘I am the body’. But even this is a mental state and does not last. It comes and goes like all other states. The illusion of being the body-mind is there, only because it is not investigated. Non-investigation is the thread on which all the states of mind are strung. It is like darkness in a closed room. It is there — apparently. But when the room is opened, where does it go? Continue reading

world of words – Nisargadatta

“Awareness is primordial; it is the original state, beginning-less, endless, un-caused, un-supported, without parts, without change. Consciousness is on contact, a reflection against a surface, a state of duality. There can be no consciousness without awareness, but there can be awareness without consciousness, as in deep sleep. Awareness is absolute, consciousness is relative to its content; consciousness is always of something.” —Nisargadatta Maharaj ..*:

Be careful. The moment you start talking you create a verbal universe, a universe of words, ideas, concepts and abstractions, interwoven and interdependent, most wonderfully generating, supporting and explaining each other and yet all without essence or substance, mere creations of the mind. Words create words, reality is silent.

Nisargadatta, I Am That, Chapter 87

My Questions:
Can we accept this as true? What does it mean to look at our ‘world’ as a creation of the mind? Is what we call our ‘mind’ much more than we have heretofore assumed it to be? Beyond the mind, is there a reality that is something the mind can never comprehend or try to grasp?

Food for thought.

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do not lose yourself

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“If you do not lose yourself, then even though you have difficulty, there is actually no problem whatsoever. You just sit in the midst of the problem; when you are a part of the problem, or when the problem is a part of you, there is no problem, because you are the problem itself. The problem is you yourself. If this is so, there is no problem.

“When your life is always a part of your surroundings—in other words, when you are called back to yourself, in the present moment—then there is no problem. When you start to wander about in some delusion which is something apart from you yourself, then your surroundings are not real anymore, and your mind is not real anymore. If you yourself are deluded, then your surroundings are also a misty, foggy delusion. Once you are in the midst of delusion, there is no end to delusion. You will be involved in deluded ideas one after another. Most people live in delusion, involved in their problem, trying to solve their problem. But just to live is actually to live in problems. And to solve the problem is to be a part of it, to be one with it.”

Shunryu Suzuki, Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind, p. 82 Continue reading

a verbal universe

world of wordsBe careful.

The moment you start talking you create a verbal universe,

a universe of words, ideas, concepts and abstractions,

interwoven and interdependent, most wonderfully generating,

supporting and explaining each other and yet all without essence or substance,

mere creations of the mind.

Words create words, reality is silent.

(Nisargadatta, I Am That, Chapter 87)

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You must remember that you are prior to the word; kill the words.

Don’t frame your knowledge, don’t condition it by words.

Be prior to the words.

source

Here we get how emphatic Nisargadatta could be in the conversation with seekers from around the world who came to hear him in his small loft in Mumbai, India. “Kill the words!” He wants us to realize that real knowledge is the sense of that which is before our verbal world. The verbal world has its limited function which he often acknowledges, but here he speaks to the need to see it for what it is: of the mind. Before and beyond consciousness is our primordial knowing and words can very often, if not always, distract us from getting our own direct perception of that First Reality, the Absolute.

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