gladness

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“If we deny our happiness, resist our satisfaction,

we lessen the importance of their deprivation.

We must risk delight. We can do without pleasure,

but not delight. Not enjoyment. We must have

the stubbornness to accept our gladness in

the ruthless furnace of this world.”

source: A Brief For The Defense, Jack Gilbert 

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a worthy occupation

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Ramana:

175. The only worthy occupation is to thoroughly absorb the ego by turning Selfward and, without allowing it to rise, to thus abide quietly, like a waveless ocean, in Self-Knowledge, having annihilated the delusive mind-ghost, which had been wandering about unobstructed.

176. The truly powerful tapas is that state in which, having lost the sense of doership, and knowing well that all is His Will, one is relieved from the delusion of the foolish ego. Thus should you know.
(The last sentence may also mean, ‘Therefore, acquire such tapas’.)

source: Ramana, Guru Vachaka Kovai PDF p. 75

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My Comment:

I notice that here it is said “…thoroughly absorb the ego by turning SelfwardThis sense of absorbing the ego changes the idea of having to annihilate, or suppress, or fight the ego. The ego structure as a behavior pattern of the limited self, is of course part of who and what I am and so to attempt to divorce myself or separate myself from ego is illusory. When awareness is no longer obstructed by ignorance then ego is naturally absorbed into the greater Self. 

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predominantly feeling

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Ramana:

Q: How long can the mind stay or be kept in the Heart?

Ramana: The period extends by practice.

Q: What happens at the end of the period?

R: The mind returns to the present normal state. Unity in the Heart
is replaced by variety of phenomena perceived. This is called the
outgoing mind. The heart-going mind is called the resting mind.

Q: Is all this process merely intellectual or does it exhibit feeling
predominantly?

R: The latter.

source: Ramana Talks Complete, PDF 38/704

 My Comment:

Continue reading

the elusive “I”

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Ramana

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Q: Should it not be reduced to a single point analysing the unanalysable, elementary and vaguely perceived and elusive ‘I’?

Ramana:

Yes. It is really like gazing into vacancy or a dazzling crystal or light.

Q: Can the mind be fixed to that point? How?

If the mind is distracted, ask the question promptly, “To whom do these distracting thoughts arise?” That takes you back to the ‘I’ point promptly.

source: Ramana Talks Complete, PDF 37/704

Continue reading

self-pity

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Krishnamurti on Suffering:

 Self-pity is one of the elements of sorrow. Another element is being attached to someone and encouraging or fostering his attachment to you. Sorrow is not only there when attachment fails you but its seed is in the very beginning of that attachment. In all this the trouble is the utter lack of knowing oneself. Knowing oneself is the ending of sorrow. We are afraid to know ourselves because we have divided ourselves into the good and the bad, the evil and the noble, the pure and the impure. The good is always judging the bad, and these fragments are at war with each other.

Continue reading

clarity and kindness

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four sparrows 9_27_b

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affectionate detachment, enormous goodwill

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Nisargadatta:

What is to be universal — not as a concept, but as a way of life? Not to separate, not to oppose, but to understand and love whatever contacts you, is living universally. To be able to say truly: I am the world, the world is me, I am at home in the world, the world is my own. Continue reading

jumping off points

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Nisargadatta:

What is your core state? In that true accomplished state, there is no
scope for even space, let alone the words. In the process of understanding
my Guru’s words as to how ‘I am’, I realized ‘I am not’. In that state there is
no unstruck sound either. In the process of Neti, Neti (not this, not this) it
happens. In the state of ‘I amness’ finally everything disappears and you get
stabilized.

source: Nisargadatta, I am Unborn

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My Comment:

These remarks by Nisargadatta are what I like to call “jumping off points”, meaning that they are suitable to bring the mind to its limits. Then it is up to you to “jump off” to another kind of understanding, beyond the mind.

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