the highest form of passion

shikan-taza

::

My Comment:

Sitting is a term that has a deep meaning in Zen. Krishnamurti calls it ‘complete negation which is the highest form of passion’. Sitting in this sense calls for all of our energy on all levels.When there is any loss of energy through identification with our fears, desires, ambitions, visions, regrets, opinions, etc. etc. then we do not have the energy required for this highest form of passion.  Continue reading

honest with yourself

::

“…completely quiet, neither thinking nor afraid, and yet be extraordinarily, passionately alive…”

::

Krishnamurti:

…we do not ask. We want to be told. One of the most curious things in the structure of our psyche is that we all want to be told because we are the result of the propaganda of ten thousand years. We want to have our thinking confirmed and corroborated by another, whereas to ask a question is to ask it of yourself. What I say has very little value. You will forget it the moment you shut this book, or you will remember and repeat certain phrases, or you will compare what you have read here with some other book – but you will not face your own life. And that is all that matters – your life, yourself, your pettiness, your shallowness, your brutality, your violence, your greed, your ambition, your daily agony and endless sorrow – that is what you have to understand and nobody on earth or in heaven is going to save you from it but yourself.

Continue reading

maturity of heart and mind is essential

This rabbit symbolizes the alertness needed to enter into Nisargadatta’s understanding.

::

My Comment: 

In this excerpt from the talks with Nisargadatta (I AM THAT) three Sanskrit terms are used: 1. vyakta (the observer); 2. vyakti (the observed, also the person); and 3. avyakta (the ground of observation, also the Supreme or Absolute). The three are really only one and this talk goes into an understanding of their relationship to each other for the purpose of deepening our understanding of how consciousness works. Strictly speaking they have no relationship to each other because they are one:

Q: What is the relation between the vyakta and the avyakta?

Nisargadatta Maharaj: How can there be relation when they are one? All talk of separation and relation is due to the distorting and corrupting influence of ‘I-am-the-body’ idea. The outer self (vyakti) is merely a projection on the body-mind of the inner self (vyakta), which again is only an expression of the Supreme Self (avyakta) which is all and none.

::

In the following passages Nisargadatta goes into more detail on this topic, which some of you might find as enlightening as I do:

Continue reading

be the fish, be the water

::

The observer is the observed.

::

I am alone. “I alone am.” These enigmatic words were the catalyst for Nisargadatta to awaken to his true state. What arises in me when I let them sink in?

All mirrors show me movements of my energy stream for the purpose of auto-correction because this existence strives continually for balance and the cancelling out of all imbalance. Continue reading

awake without any challenge

::

“…knowing yourself so completely

that the mind is no longer seeking.”

My Comment: Krishnamurti enters here into an understanding that requires us to use our cognitive faculty of the mind to think logically, but also to allow our direct perception of life to be active at the same time. He explores here what it means to make demands on life and how this movement of ‘demand’ will create its own perception which is limited and tainted by the demand itself.

In the second part of this excerpt Krishnamurti speaks once again about meditation:
“Meditation is one of the greatest arts in life – perhaps the greatest, and one cannot possibly learn it from anybody, that is the beauty of it.”  

So it is about the mind itself learning about its own movement and out of that learning it changes the way it moves.

These passages ask you to let them sink in beyond the surface which wants to know if something confirms its present view of things or contradicts them. Here the outcome is unknown and it is uncomfortable to not be given anything to ‘hold on to’. Krishnamurti asks us to be our own master.

Enjoy! Continue reading

our toys absorb us

My Comment:

When Krishnamurti speaks of a mind that has no center and no periphery and therefore no space and no time I feel myself transported to an understanding of all of us, indeed all of existence, as one being. All of our concepts are false, are trickery of the mind. I am not ‘I’, you are not ‘you’, he/she is not… etc. I know that state in which all identities have been melted away by the vastness and power that is not of our language or our individual perception. Each of us knows of that power and yet we succumb to such trivial discrimination that creates this illusion of separation.Now could be the time when these illusions will no longer be able to propagate themselves through us. We are living right now in eternity and yet we persevere in distracting ourselves from this obvious fact. Perhaps, just perhaps, now is the time for us to finally ‘get real’. Why not? Continue reading

food for contemplation

Very similar to our Cob House Sauna

::

There is nothing wrong with your world, it is your thinking yourself to be separate from it that creates disorder.

::

My Comment: Today there was a really hot sauna here at the Lost Valley Community. It is in a beautiful cob structure, large enough for 12 – 15 persons comfortably. I had 4 cycles of hot sauna and dunking in the nearby stream – ice cold! Delightful. The result is that I am able to present to you these thoughts of Nisargadatta that I have been contemplating for the last few days, but my eyes are not focusing well enough for me to write my thoughts on his thoughts – so here you have his thoughts, pure and simple! May they invite you to explore consciousness… Continue reading