this firm understanding

“Throw away every thought, every experience, everything that happens after this consciousness has come.”

This is a dialog between Nisargadatta and a visitor. In it Nisargadatta’s emphasis on deconstructing all that we think we know and destruction of our cherished beliefs is very clear.

July 26, 1980

Questioner: I have come to Maharaj in the hope that he may help me put an end to this search.

Nisargadatta Maharaj: Can you communicate to me what you have understood?

Q It is all concepts, all illusion.

M. Yes.

Q. I don’t believe in processes that take time and disciplines, I’ve done all that. I want it to end.

M. The basic fact – that you are not the body – must be clear to you by now. You are working in the world and you think that you are doing that work, but what is really happening is this: the life force, when it comes out in thoughts and words, is the mind, so it is this pram mind, life force mind, which is the acting principle. The beingness, the consciousness, is the God which witnesses the life force and mind working. It does not interfere; it merely witnesses. The reason for your unhappiness is that you think it is you are working.

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the clanging of pots and pans

 

“The sum and substance of spirituality is nothing but to come to a decision, make a judgment, about Self, God and the world – what is it? You must first dispose of this question.”

Our thoughts are like the clanging of pots and pans. The vital breath starts to flow through body-mind and its activity makes noise, just like the metal of pots banging together. We then, after the fact, assume there is a thinker who is processing reality and thinking with the intention of pursuing purposes and goals. Do we ever question this basic assumption? Look at our thoughts and inquire if they might possibly be just the noise that the vital breath makes as it moves through the body-mind. Continue reading

our intrinsic inner value

 

The following statement expresses what our physical existence is all about:

“We are born into flesh to materialize as best we can the great joy and spontaneity of our nature.” 

(Spoken by Jane Roberts in 1973 and recorded by her husband for the Seth Book “The Nature of Personal Reality”.)

UBUNTU feet circle 1

Our story ~

We found ourselves born into flesh:

the first one-cell moved and lived.

Shape-shifting and flowing into ever-newer forms, the spontaneous joy of the love to BE!

Immensity of eons was our playground for changes without end leading us into living miracles.
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a very complicated riddle

 

Q: “Is there a desire not to die and lose your body?”

Nisargadatta: “The sage is not concerned with that.”

Q: “Is there a desire of the body, not of the Self?”

N: “You may say something like that; this is the administrative action of that beingness. It is a very complicated riddle. You have to discard whatever you know, whatever you have read, and have a firm conviction about That about which nobody knows anything. You can’t get any information about That, and about That you must have firm conviction. How difficult it is.

“Most people reach that state which is, but nobody reaches that state which is not. It is very rarely that one can reach that state. It transcends all knowledge.

“Most essential is that knowledge “I Am.” Claim it, appropriate it as your own. If that is not there, nothing is. Knowledge of all the stages will be obtained only with the aid of this knowledge “I Am.”

“From the Absolute no-knowing state, spontaneously, this consciousness “I Am” has appeared -there is no reason, no cause. Spontaneously it has come, with the waking state, deep sleep, the five elemental play, three Gunas, and Prakriti and Purusha. Then it embraces the body as its self and therefore identifies as a male or a female. This “I Amness” has its own love to be: it wants to remain, to perpetuate itself, but it is not eternal.

“This passing show may be likened to the following situation: suppose I was well all along, then suddenly I was sick and the doctor gave me medicine. After three days my fever was gone. So this stage of fever for three days is the “I Am” consciousness. Exactly like that -a passing show, a time-bound state.

“This principle loves to be, and one must not belittle it – it is a very Godly principle. This “I Amness” contains the entire cosmos.

“It is said that all this is unreal. When is it certified as unreal? Only when one understands this temporary phase. And in the process of understanding one is in the Absolute and from there recognizes this as a temporary, unreal state.”

Source: Nisargadatta, Prior to Consciousness, July 19th, 1980

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the illusion of control

“Question: What about patterns?
Wolinsky: There are no such things as patterns. There is an “I” thought, which believes in patterns and sees patterns as a way to imagine that it can secure survival. Seeing and believing that the future mimics the past is a trick of the mind a habit that the noted philosophers David Hume, and later John Stuart Mill, call a “habit of mind,” to paraphrase: “The mind [nervous system] will create the illusion and make it appear as though the future mimics the past, and will take whatever measure it must to make it appear so.” Why? Because it aids in the illusion of control and better future survival, if I imagine that the past mimics the future, then “I” (imagine) by knowing the past (as in psychotherapy) “I” can control the future (relationships, money, etc.) and survive better. There is no pattern that independently exists separate from the perceiver or observer of the pattern.”

“You never put your foot
in the same river twice.”
—Heraclitus

source: Stephen Wolinsky, You Are Not, p. 57

 

My Comment:

Our thoughts are imaginations, assumptions, inferences etc. Yes, there are thoughts that are based in reality, but we must be free of illusion to be able to use such thoughts of a new and different quality. When I am in touch with the heart of reality I am in the eternal present, the NOW. In that space all challenges are met by a higher intelligence and I know what to do in each moment.

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the heart of reality

A Cup Of Tea

“According to Buddhism, one can only reach reality through direct experience. … Study and speculation are based on concepts. In conceptualizing we cut up reality into small pieces which seem to be independent of one another. This manner of conceiving things is called imaginative and discriminative knowledge (vikalpa).

“The faculty which, on the contrary, directly experiences reality without passing through concepts is called non-discriminative and non-imaginative Wisdom (nirvikalpajnana). This wisdom is the fruit of meditation. It is a direct and perfect knowledge of reality, a form of knowledge in which one does not distinguish subject and object, a form of knowledge that cannot be conceived by the intellect and expressed by language.

Experience Itself

“SUPPOSE THAT WE ARE TOGETHER at my house and I invite you to have a cup of tea. You take your cup, you taste the tea which is contained in the cup, and you drink a little of it. You seem to take pleasure in the tea. You put your cup on the table and we continue our conversation.

“Now, suppose that I should ask you what you think of the tea. You are going to use your memory, your concepts, and your vocabulary in order to give a description of your sensation. You will say, for example, It is very good tea. It is the best Tieh Kuan Ying tea, manufactured at Taipei. I can still taste it in my mouth. It refreshes me.” You could express your sensation in many other ways. But these concepts and these words describe your direct experience of the tea; they are not this experience itself. Indeed, in the direct experience of the tea, you do not make the distinction that you are the subject of the experience and that the tea is its object; you do not think that the tea is the best or the worst, of the Tieh Kuan Ying of Taipei. There is no concept or word that frames this experience, this pure sensation resulting from experience. You can give as many descriptions as you wish, but it is only you who witness this direct experience of the tea that I have given you. When someone listens to you he can only recreate for himself a certain sensation, basing this on experiences that he might have had himself in the past concerning tea. And you yourself, when you try to describe your experience, are already no longer in the experience.

In the experience, you are one with the tea, there is no distinction between subject and object, there is no evaluation, there is no discrimination. This pure sensation can be presented as an example of non-discriminative knowledge. It is that which introduces us to the heart of reality.”

source: Thich Nhat Hanh, Zen Keys, p. 39 – 40

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the ending of comparison – Krishnamurti

the bee whispers among the leaves

To compare ourselves to another is the beginning of insanity, and yet it is highly accepted in most societies of our world. 

Krishnamurti, at the age of  87 dictated the journal “To Himself” using a tape recorder. In this passage he speaks of measurement and comparison and equates them to “becoming” and “the desire to achieve”. These are key concepts that have been instilled in our mass consciousness from our earliest age. Our acceptance of them almost as facts of life have blinded us to the repercussions of these beliefs. K then confronts us with statements that seemingly negate some of our most cherished views, especially if we see ourselves as meditators. For example:

“This meditation must not be a conscious meditation in deliberately chosen postures.”

This meditation must be totally unconscious, never knowing that you are meditating.”

If you deliberately meditate it is another form of desire, as any other expression of desire.”

Meditation is a movement without any motive, without words and the activity of thought.”

Meditation is a movement without any motive, without words and the activity of thought.”

“It must be something that is not deliberately set about.”

These statements are very unsettling, for they do not give us a clear instruction as to HOW TO. He continues:

“Meditation is not words, a mantram, or self-hypnosis, the drug of illusions.”

“It must happen without your volition.”

“It must take place in the quiet stillness of the night, when you are suddenly awake and see that the brain is quiet and there is a peculiar quality of meditation going on.”

“It must take place as silently as a snake among the tall grass, green in the fresh morning light. It must take place in the deep recesses of the brain.”

“Meditation is not an achievement. There is no method, system or practice. Meditation begins with the ending of comparison, the ending of the becoming or not becoming. As the bee whispers among the leaves so the whispering of meditation is action.”

What is K pointing to here? Something that cannot be grasped by our thinking mind? Something we can only wait for, but also without any expectation? Is it possible to receive a subliminal transmission through his words that can catalyze in us a shedding of all that is NOT meditation, and so clear our space for that “other” to enter our life spontaneously, without our volition?

I love the metaphor of “no room in the inn”. If my waking consciousness is occupied already with any number of desires and goals I am pursuing, no matter how sublime and subtle they may be, then that “whispering of meditation” will have no space in my life.

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Here is the complete passage from this journal entry in context:

“To live without comparison, to live without any kind of measurement inwardly, never to compare what you are with what you should be. The word meditation’ means not only to ponder, to think over, to probe, to look, to weigh; it also has a much deeper meaning in Sanskrit – to measure, which is to become’. In meditation there must be no measurement. This meditation must not be a conscious meditation in deliberately chosen postures.

“This meditation must be totally unconscious, never knowing that you are meditating. If you deliberately meditate it is another form of desire, as any other expression of desire. The objects may vary; your meditation may be to reach the highest, but the motive is the desire to achieve, as the business man, as the builder of a great cathedral. Meditation is a movement without any motive, without words and the activity of thought. It must be something that is not deliberately set about. Only then is meditation a movement in the infinite, measureless to man, without a goal, without an end and without a beginning. And that has a strange action in daily life, because all life is one and then becomes sacred. And that which is sacred can never be killed. To kill another is unholy. It cries to heaven as a bird kept in a cage. One never realizes how sacred life is, not only your little life but the lives of millions of others, from the things of nature to extraordinary human beings.

“And in meditation which is without measurement, there is the very action of that which is most noble, most sacred and holy.

“The other day on the banks of a river [this is a memory from when he was at Benares on the banks of the Ganges] – how lovely are rivers; there isn’t only one sacred river, all rivers throughout the world have their own divinity – the other day a man was sitting on the banks of a river wrapped in a fawn colored cloth. His hands were hidden, his eyes were shut and his body was very still. He had beads in his hands and he was repeating some words and the hands were moving from bead to bead. He had done this for many years and he never missed a bead. And the river rolled along beside him. Its current was deep. It began among the great mountains, snow-clad and distant; it began as a small stream, and as it moved south it gathered all the small streams and rivers and became a great river. In that part of the world they worshiped it. One does not know for how many years this man had been repeating his mantra and rolling the beads. He was meditating – at least people thought he was meditating and probably he did too. So all the passers-by looked at him, became silent and then went on with their laughter and chatter. That almost motionless figure – one could see through the cloth only a slight action of the fingers – had sat there for a very long time, completely absorbed, for he heard no other sound than the sound of his own words and the rhythm of it, the music of it. And he would say that he was meditating. There are a thousand others like him, all over the world, in quiet deep monasteries among the hills and towns and beside the rivers.

“Meditation is not words, a mantram, or self-hypnosis, the drug of illusions. It must happen without your volition. It must take place in the quiet stillness of the night, when you are suddenly awake and see that the brain is quiet and there is a peculiar quality of meditation going on. It must take place as silently as a snake among the tall grass, green in the fresh morning light. It must take place in the deep recesses of the brain.

“Meditation is not an achievement. There is no method, system or practice. Meditation begins with the ending of comparison, the ending of the becoming or not becoming. As the bee whispers among the leaves so the whispering of meditation is action.”

  • Krishnamurti: Krishnamurti to Himself, Ojai California Friday 22nd April, 1983

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The American Dream

 

Chief Seattle

Chief Seattle

Chief Seattle, Leader of the Duwamish, Suquamish and other Northwest Tribes:

In the simple space of the Natural World it is easy to see the face of the Creator, of the infinite Father of all things. He shows himself in the clouds, the rivers, the rocks and in the fire. His is the face of every beast, every fly and every woman, child and man. My people and the other Natural Peoples lived in that world. Compared to you today it was easy for us to live every moment in thankfulness to Wakan Tanka, the Great Mystery.

You now live in an un-natural world. You have lost touch with Nature. You know this – you do not need me to tell you. Is this bad? In our view it is neither good nor bad. It is the dream which the Father is dreaming for you. Allow me to explain. Continue reading